Wildlife of Treasure Island Florida

Treasure Island, Florida is a beautiful beach teeming with wide variety of wildlife. From the sea life to the reptiles, there is an abundance of creatures for the nature-lover to enjoy. Whether you are in the mood to simply view the beach's animal community or want to hook some of the local fish, Treasure Island is a great place to feed your desires. Many of the species can be observed without ever having to leave the shore, but those who venture out on boats run into an even wider range of amazing creatures.

Fish – With Treasure Island being a beach community, there are obviously quite a variety of species lurking around the waters. The Gulf of Mexico is one of the best places to spend a day either snorkeling and looking at all the underwater creatures or sitting with your pole catching some of these delicious fish. Some of the species of fish that are normally found in these waters include:

  • Grouper
  • Snapper
  • Kingfish
  • Cobia
  • Permit
  • Flounder
  • Pompano
  • Tarpon
  • Barracuda
  • Blacktip Sharks
  • Spanish Mackeral

Mammals – There are much more than just fish roaming around the Treasure Island area. There are a variety of mammals that call this lovely beach community their home as well. Many people love to come to St Pete to catch a glimpse of the beautiful dolphins and manatees. Dolphins are one of the most sought after attractions of many tourists visiting the area. The good part is that most of the tourists are in luck because catching a view of a dolphin around Treasure Island is extremely easy. The dolphins love the play and show off in the water and are usually even easy to spot from the beach. When out on a boat in the summer months, it is not unusual for a pod of dolphins to swim behind your boat. Manatees are another creature that people always love to fit into their sightseeing. While slightly more elusive than the dolphin, it is not rare to catch a glimpse of one of these "sea cows".

Reptiles – There are a wide variety of reptiles that call this area of ​​Florida home. There are upwards of 45 different species of snakes in the state of Florida, both venomous and non-venomous. Florida is also home to a few varieties of sea turtles, the most common of which is the Loggerhead Turtle. Florida beaches are home to 80% of the Loggerheads in the US and as many as 68,000 nests can be found in Florida each year!

With an abundance of wildlife around the state, Florida can be a wonderful place to observe nature. Treasure Island and the Gulf Coast have a unique group of animals and no one who loves nature should miss these beautiful creatures. Always remember not to disturb the wildlife and allow them to live and breed naturally, so many generations in the future can enjoy their beauty.

Common Wildlife in Residential Areas

The Mid-west and Eastern parts of the United States is widely known across the country for its farms, crops, race cars, and football, but this region actually has a lot more to offer. With each season, homeowners witness magnificent changes in the beautiful flora and fauna in their surrounding environments, a characteristic commonly overlooked in our towns.

The fall and winter seasons bring new color and snow, and animals that are covered in fur. Then the spring and summer rolls in, bringing out the sun and hibernating animals from their dens. The animals here in these regions are fascinating and fun to learn about. Let’s briefly discuss the most common forest wildlife spotted among residential communities, and how they live.

Squirrels

Squirrels are recognized in the medium-sized rodent category. They are slender-bodied animals, covered in a thick fur. They have a long bushy tail, great vision, and strong claws for climbing and grasping their food. They make their homes in trees where they nest their young as well. They typically feed on foods rich in protein and fat, such as: nuts, seeds, tree buds, small insects, conifer cones, fruits, and fungi. They are widely seen in forests and woods, as well as, residential and urban areas.

Raccoons

Raccoons are a medium-sized mammal often seen in areas with mixed deciduous trees. They have black stripes on their long tails, and their bodies are covered in a dense and coarse fur. This fur allows them to survive in harsh weather conditions, by staying cool in the hot seasons and warm in the cold ones.

One signature trait raccoons share is a mask-like black patch over their eyes, making them look like bandits. This, along with their mischievous behavior in residential areas, has coined them the nickname, “bandits”. Although mischievous, they are very intelligent and have dexterous hands that allow easy gripping and climbing; and they create dens for their homes where they breed and feed their offspring.

Deer

Deer are seen all over rural areas of the country. They live in forest, woods, meadows, and protected nature parks. There are different species of deer, all similar and not-so-similar to each other. Deer breed and produce offspring called fawns. The female deer is a doe and the males are called bucks. Male deer are characterized the most by their long and powerful antlers.

A doe does not have antlers, and are sometimes lighter in coat color. This allows them to blend better to their natural surroundings and keep out of the sight of predators. Deer are a wonderful and tasty source of meat for many families in North America and around the world.

Wildlife Preservation

The wildlife in our country is certainly a wonderful, yet commonly overlooked asset. Animals in the forests and wooded areas should stay protected by respecting their habitats and not over using their resources. There are circumstances when wildlife may lose their way, or be forced into urban and residential areas. In this case, it is important to contact a wildlife removal expert to safely and humanely remove and relocate wild animals from your property.

Consuming Our Way to Extinction – Rare & Exotic Animal Trade

The native people of Laos, China and other Asian nations have taken advantage of the new road infrastructure to escalate the demise of jungle creatures big and small. Their partners in "crimes" against nature are European nations and the USA consumers the buy and consume or wear the harvested black market bushmeats and products in large quantities.

According to United Nations, global trade in frog meat has soared in the past 20 years. France and the United States are the two largest importers, with France importing between 2,500 and 4,000 tons each year since 1995. Indonesia exports more than 5,000 tons annually, mostly to Europe. Frogs' legs are also very popular in Asian cuisine.

Until twenty-five years ago, hundreds of tigers roamed large swaths of relatively untouched jungle in Laos. But in recent years particularly in the last decade development, deforestation, and a booming traffic in wildlife have reduced Laotian tiger population to 50 or fewer individuals, according to Johnson and other scientists. The main driver of the rapid depletion of tigers and scores of other species of birds, animals, and reptiles is the growing affluence of neighboring Thailand, Vietnam, and especially China, where a vast new market for wildlife products has arisen.

Laos is the latest front in the struggle to rein in an underground global trade that every year kills tens of millions of wild birds, mammals, and reptiles to supply multi-billion dollar markets around the world.

The US and Europe rank among the largest buyers of elephant ivory and tiger parts and frog, monkey and game animal (commonly referred to as bushmeat.) Along with the exotic pet / medicine trade takes a heavy toll on wildlife not just in Laos, but around the world in Southeast Asia, the Russian Far East, Africa, and even North America.

A rapid development and growing affluence create demand for more commercial hunting and trapping; an increase in international trade; the emergence of increasingly sophisticated smuggling networks; an influx of weapons and technology; and easier access to wilderness areas because of road building by extractive industries. The opening of the Laotian economy like other native economies around the world, put a price on the heads of virtually all animals, ranging from river insects to tigers.

Overexploitation of wildlife for trade, must be addressed in a respectful sensitive, effective and fair honest manner for local people. This is a great delicate educational and economic challenge that has the potential to open the way outside investment that has recently become a flood. Like other forest-dependent people, rural Lao long relied on hunting to supplement their rice-dominated diet with protein. But the opening of the economy put a price on the heads of virtually all animals, ranging from river insects to tigers. This along with the lack of wildlife education and preservation, combined with an abundance of left over weapons from years of war, gave hunters the incentive and the tools to convert rich biodiversity into cash.

This scenario has been repeated around the world many times a day and the result both on land, sea and in the air are world has become poorer as these animals, plants, insects, birds, reptiles and amphibians go silent because we have chosen this consumer mentality, but we can make and are making better choices.

Everyone can help.

Refuse to buy, eat or wear products or use cosmetics made from wild animals at the expense of the biodiversity of our beloved planet.

Yes, we can save our world.

Conserving Vital Bear Habitat in Europe

The role of specialized bear tours is very important in raising awareness of the issues surrounding the conservation of habitat and the survival of the bear. Tours are offered by reputable wildlife travel companies and provide visitors with the opportunity to see these magnificent animals in the wild. Despite their size and prowess, bears are by no means safe in our world. But while they face a constant struggle to survive, fortunately there are several conservation efforts in place to protect their existence.

Conservation Projects in Europe – Aims and Objectives

Most conservation efforts in Europe are centred on non-profit objectives that aim to protect habitat. Depending on where you go, there will be various conservation projects happening in the area you visit. Every area will have its own take on conservation, but there are some common elements seen across them all. Most are multi focussed and concentrate on several species rather than just one – a sensible approach when you consider how intricately intertwined the ecosystems are with the overarching 'circle of life'.

In Europe for example, much work is going on to stabilize the numbers of the Brown Bear and improve its existing habitat. The projects aim to increase the supply of food as well as tackle poaching and hunting in the mountain ranges. All conservation work involves research and constant monitoring of the population in an attempt to assess the effectiveness of the measures put in place.

A Successful Example

In order to increase the food supply to habitat in the Cantabrian Mountains of Spain, there has been huge push to plant fruit trees. More than 6,000 have been planted to date, providing the bear population with much needed sustenance. Poaching and hunting is illegal but it still goes on, so rangers have been put in place to patrol the popular hunting grounds and remove snare traps.

Bear tours to see the Brown Bear in Spain are an excellent way to experience a country leading the way in awareness and education of wildlife conservation. The Bear Way is a designated footpath maintained for the use of visitors wanting to see and learn about these animals in the wild, and young children are exposed to educational programs at school. These programs encourage the understanding of nature, local ecosystems, and promote diversity and preservation of species, which aids in conservation efforts.

On specialized bear tours with the best wildlife companies, the guide will have plenty of information about the conservation programs in the local area.